2018 Young Adult Service Award Presented by The Church Club of New York

2018 Young Adult Service Award Presented by The Church Club of New York

The The Church Club of New York’s Young Adult of the Year Service Recognition Award is a tri-state, regional program that recognizes the exceptional volunteer service of either an individual or a group of young adults in their 20s and 30s. The Award is accompanied by a $1,000 honorarium, of which $500 is designated to the highlighted church or community ministry. This year, eight young adults from parishes in the Episcopal Dioceses of New York, New Jersey, Newark, Long Island, and Connecticut were nominated for their commitment to enriching their communities with their talents and time. The nominees include: Marisol Ortega of Grace Church/La Gracia in White Plains, who organized an Adult and Pediatric First Aid/CPR/AED training course and serves as a young adult leader and liaison between her English and Spanish-speaking congregations. Carrie Sheffield of St. Thomas Fifth Avenue, Manhattan, was nominated because of her work with Silicon Harlem a tech development and social/economic investment program. Adam Martinek, also of from St. Thomas, was nominated for 12 years of dedicated service (starting at age 16) at the Saint Thomas soup kitchen. Tivaun Cooper of Trinity Wall Street was nominated for his advocacy and leadership within the LGBTQIA community within the Diocese of New York. Nolan Burke of Grace Church, Manhattan, was nominated for his volunteer work with Habitat for Humanity, donating 150+ hours over the last 2 ½ years. Kristin A. Vieira was nominated for her leadership in organizing and teaching adult education forums at Calvary-St. George. Tamara Wernham of St. Philip’s in Harlem, was nominated for her work as coordinator of the Ecclesia, an outdoor worshiping community...
Young Adult Leaders Making a Difference at General Convention

Young Adult Leaders Making a Difference at General Convention

Two minutes sounds like no time at all, and yet as it turns out can actually be a little bit difficult to fill. This is particularly true at seven o’clock in the morning, when those of us who typically self-describe as “night people” are only just shaking off the sleep, in order to make it over to the hotel/convention center and up to committee hearings to offer testimony within that very two-minute window. That was how I felt, at least, as I spent ten days back in July doing just that, at the Episcopal Church’s 79th General Convention in Austin, TX. A group of us, all between the ages of 18 and 30 (many from the NYC area), came to the convention to offer our support to resolutions seeking to highlight and take action on peace and justice issues facing the whole church today. We testified on, lobbied for, and even drafted some legislation—from issues of racial reconciliation to gun violence, to action on immigration, to divestments and socially responsible investing, to sexism and sexual assault, to prayer book revision, to police violence and mental health … the list goes well on. We also participated in direct actions of public witness led by our Bishops Against Gun Violence, as well as clergy from across the church at the T. Don Hutto Detention Center. Episcopalians gather in public witness outside immigrant detention center    At every General Convention since 2006, the Episcopal Peace Fellowship (EPF) — an organization which traces its origins to a handful of New York City priests seeking to support young people choosing conscientious objection to World...
Reflections on a Reflection Day: Stories and Reflections from Young Adult Voices

Reflections on a Reflection Day: Stories and Reflections from Young Adult Voices

Storytelling is a practice often exalted but rarely meditated upon. “Story-rich” media abound, and storytelling is considered a vital skill for one’s career. The telling and interpreting of stories is clearly also a central feature of Christian life, not just within the reading of scripture, but also within the liturgy, evangelism, and contemplation. So, needless to say, the opportunity to spend a day reflecting on storytelling as a spiritual practice was irresistible. The day incorporated teaching, discussion, fellowship, and opportunities for reflection (no surprises there). Thoughts of the day are still percolating but here I’ve tried to summarize some of the moments and ideas that have particularly stuck with me. First was the simple but powerful idea that stories cannot be atomized and still be understood. It is not possible to reduce the meaning of a story to a single term or sentence. Our time opened with a reading of the parable of the prodigal son, and the teaching over the day reminded me that with stories like this one, terms like “repentance” and “grace” cannot be properly understood. As someone raised in a Christian family Jesus’ parables, and other stories from the Bible, were part of the background of my childhood. I literally cannot remember a time without them and had never noticed before how my Christian vocabulary depended on them. After discussing the nature and power of stories, and taking the time to listen to a few excellent examples, we moved to thinking about stories from a theological perspective. This meant reflecting on a particular story first from a near perspective, focusing on the emotions, characters, and...
Lenten Sushi Fridays!

Lenten Sushi Fridays!

This Lent, the Young Adult Network in partnership with parishes across Manhattan invite all people in their 20’s and 30’s for an evening of sushi and spirituality on four different Fridays. $15 suggested cash donation for food and drinks (non-alcoholic). Friday, 2/16 at Church of the Incarnation RSVP on Facebook or Meetup Friday, 2/23, at Grace Church Manhattan RSVP on Facebook or Meetup Friday 3/9, at Trinity-Wall Street RSVP on Facebook or Meetup Friday, 3/23, at St. Peter’s Chelsea RSVP on Facebook or Meetup RSVP to any of the Sushi Fridays by email...
The New York Haiti Project – Building Bonds of Love

The New York Haiti Project – Building Bonds of Love

“In the midst of suffering and difficulty Haiti is full of faithful, hopeful people. The New York Haiti Project seeks to build bonds of affection between rural Haiti and New York through the Episcopal Church. The people of Martel, Haiti have asked us to help them build a school and a church for their community. They are actively working to transform their community, and we are being transformed too.” – Father Sam Owen   In July of 2017, I was fortunate to go on a trip with The New York Haiti Project to visit Martel, Haiti. We were on a mission to assist the people in building a new school and church and to deepen our relationship between the Diocese of New York and the Episcopal Church in Haiti. Eleven participants from eleven different Episcopal Churches in New York ventured out to experience Haitian community, to pray, worship and be with the people of Haiti.  The experience was eye opening and transformative. In the short time that we were there we saw, heard, and sang with the spirited people of Martel and felt the Holy Spirit at work in the community surrounding us and in ourselves.  The projects we were there to visit were underway, but not yet complete. It took patience with ourselves and others to accept that not everything would happen on our expected time-table. In the few months, since our visit, St. Luke’s Episcopal School in Martel has opened in a temporary building, while the permanent building is being built nearby. It is exciting to share the news of the opening of a grain mill that...